Telegraph Historical Archive, 1855-2000

Resource available to authorized IU Bloomington users (on or off campus)
To link to this resource use: https://libraries.indiana.edu/resources/telegraph
Provides access to one million pages of the newspaper's backfile, from its first issue to the end of 2000, including issues of the Sunday Telegraph from 1961.
Additional Information

Launched in 1855, the Telegraph is generally seen by press historians as the start of a new era of journalism that emerged following the repeal of stamp duty and signalling the first step towards the mass-market journalism of the Daily Mail. The newspaper was directed at a wealthy, educated readership and is commonly associated with traditional Toryism, despite its more ‘liberal’ beginnings, especially in regard to foreign policy. Under the editorship of poet and Orientalist Edwin Arnold (from 1873 to 1899), the paper published widely on foreign affairs and foreign cultures. This led to the Telegraph’s coverage of Henry Morton Stanley’s expedition to Africa in search of David Livingstone, which it co-sponsored with the New York Herald. The Telegraph employed of several renowned special correspondents over the years; Winston Churchill, who reported from India in 1897, Rudyard Kipling, who braved the trenches of the First World War, and Clare Hollingworth, who, as the first female war correspondent, relayed the start of the Second World War from Poland. During the twentieth century, there was the infamous uncensored interview with Kaiser Wilhelm of 1908, in which the German chancellor successfully alienated Britain, France, Russia, and Japan. In 1942, the newspaper published the cryptic crossword puzzle responsible for recruiting Allied codebreakers during the Second World War.

Coverage:
1855-2000
Vendor:
GALE
Producer:
GALE
Interlibrary Loan:
Print-only Copy Permitted
Simultaneous User Limit:
Unlimited simultaneous users
TERMS OF USE